Cover-More

If you’re a fan of skirmish, then India’s Holi Festival should definitely be on your bucket list. It’s really just an excuse to drench people in coloured powder and water, and not to mention – a whole lot of fun. The festival celebrates the triumph of good over evil, brought about by the burning and destruction of a demoness called Holika (back in the ole’ ancient Hindu days). Also known as the festival of colours, the name came about from Lord Krishna – a Hindu god who liked to play pranks on village girls by drenching them in colour and water. Wait a minute, this sounds a little too familiar.

Holi Festival

Image: Steven Gerner 

When is Holi celebrated

Holi takes place in March each year – the day after a full moon. This year, Holi will be celebrated on Monday 13 March but will happen a day earlier in West Bengal and Odisha. Festivities will be held in most parts of India, but some a little more wild than others.

Holi Festival

Image: Jordi Bernabeu Farrús

Where can you celebrate Holi

Wherever floats your boat really, but some hot spots include Barsana village, Mathura and Vrindavan temple towns, and a three-day folk festival in West Bengal. If you’re after a more rowdy affair, then be sure to head to a party with a bangin’ DJ, and of course, plenty of colours.

Holi Festival

How to celebrate Holi

One of the first things that come to mind is hugging each other and saying ‘Happy Holi’. Yes, that’s right, it means getting up close and personal with a complete stranger. Or better yet, why not smear crazy colours over each other’s faces while dancing under water sprinkles (apologies if I’m taking you for a trip down memory lane!). Party-goers celebrate by dancing the night away and drenching each other in bright colours and water.

Holi Festival

Image: UFV

What to expect during Holi celebrations

Holi is a great way to let loose, especially if you want to have some wild, crazy, colourful fun! Yes you will end up saturated, and yes you will end up with random colours in your clothes and hair. We recommend you wear some daggy round-the-house clothes and rub some coconut oil in your hair, to prevent the colours from absorbing.  Be sure to leave your passport, camera and phone, plus any other valuables at the hotel – otherwise they might end up drenched or even permanently dyed.

Holi Festival

Image: Steven Gerner

Still not convinced? Holi is a great excuse to start new relationships by forgiving people, forgetting old feuds and patching things up with friends lost over time. And don’t forget to attend a bonfire ritual on the eve of Holi to discourage any evil spirits causing trouble. 

 

Limits, exclusions and conditions apply. This is general advice only. We do not provide any advice based on any consideration of your objectives, financial situation or needs. Consider the Combined PDS/FSG (available covermore.co.nz) before deciding about this insurance.